July 19, 2019, 07:45:03 am

Infrastructure Discussion

Started by Bus 503, December 25, 2015, 07:47:48 pm

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Barry Drive

As in heated waiting rooms? Good question.

Have a look under the seats. You may find disconnected heaters. You should also be able to see the old door jambs.

Definitely 8 and 10. Probably 15, 12 & 4.

Belconnen and City Interchanges also had heated waiting rooms. Once.

Sylvan Loves Buses

If only those heaters still worked, would be another plus side to what makes a better bus interchange, esp cause of Canberra's freezing cold nights.

Bus 400

Platform 5 had a heater that worked, I recall spending many a winters afternoon waiting for the 62 in there.

As was the same in Belconnen, even just sitting in the shelters & closing the door helped to keep the wind & hus the cold out. It must be in the planning rules for Canberra that all bus stations must be in the coldest, windiest locations 🤤☃️😉

Sylvan Loves Buses

Must be, seeing how Dickson and the replacements of Belconnen have pretty much had that happen to them.


Another question:
At Tuggeranong between platforms 3 and 8, what is contained within
the panels on the inward side of the large pylons? As long as I've noticed they've always been locked.

Barry Drive

Good to see they've installed some proper bins at Woden Interchange rather than just exposed wheelie bins.

triumph

Canberra Museum + Gallery have an exhibition of photos and artistic works by Trevor Dickinson featuring the iconic concrete bus shelters designed in 1974 by Architect Clem Cummings.
The exhibition is in the upstairs Gallery space until 27th Jan, 2019.
The Museum (CMAG) is in the City next to Civic Library.

Sylvan Loves Buses

Just a fun little fact about the concrete bunker shelters for those who are interested.
I've tested this myself so far on three random shelters, and it seems that they're very resonant to a low and mid-range C# (138.6Hz and 277.2Hz) if you 'hum' or 'ooh' - loudly or softly doesn't matter. Even if you don't know where a C# is, just try humming sometime when you're in one and gradually increase/decrease pitch and you'll hear the magic!

Busfanatic101

The 3 sets of Ashley Dr stops have opened today, to be serviced by all passing routes

Sylvan Loves Buses

On my travels a couple weeks ago, I chanced upon a concrete bunker shelter that still has its windows intact. Couldn't believe it when I saw it. It's the first or second stop after the National Museum on the 7.

Whilst concrete shelters are on my mind, I'm rather perplexed and annoyed by the fact that both concrete shelters at Narrabundah College are being moved up the road and replaced by sh*tty ad-less-shel's. For how much money, time and  effort there is in moving those things, and for the fact whichever bus stop is getting them, wouldn't it be a better idea to put the crappy shelters in the stop that's getting them and leave the bunkers?

No wait, it's Transport Canberra, who am I kidding...

Sylvan Loves Buses

In light of the future of electric and hybrid buses we'll hopefully be getting. I was thinking about the overhead displays at the interchanges the other day. Although the plan to have all the old buses gone years ago has been moved to what they hope to be within the next few years, as every bus will by then have wheelchair accessibility, would there be any possibility that the wheelchair symbol will be replaced with a lightning symbol to indicate the approaching bus is electric or hybrid?

Busnerd

I doubt they would bother as it is useless information to the passenger, it is still a bus that will be low floor and have a bike rack, passengers won't care if it's electric or not (besides us!) it's not like they're going to sigh and wait for an electric bus instead of a diesel.

We did manage to get Next There to place a lightning bolt in their app for 710 & 711 whilst they were here, although that was to make it easier for us to find and ride/photograph.

triumph

Struck what I am told is a frequent problem, today.

On an inbound R3 about 9am at the point where buses leave the busway and cross Barry Drive into Kingsley St, it took at least 4 cycles of the traffic lights to cross into Kingsley.

The problem was caused by cars queueing to enter a parking facility further along Kingsley St and backing right up to Barry Drive. As soon as the queue moved forward more cars turning left or right from Barry Drive would fill the space. Eventually the queue happened to move forward just as the green arrow for the bus lane appeared and the driver was able to cross into Kingsley St. Then followed stop and go in the queue until Rimmer St was reached, with a total delay of around 10min.

The situation was so bad that quite a few buses (apparently advised by operations to do so) went past whilst we were waiting, by-passing Kingsley St, direct to Marcus Clarke St.. This, of course, meant that any potential passengers at the Rimmer St stop were also by-passed.

A large amount of public money was spent on providing the busway along Barry Drive to enable buses to avoid the morning congestion - an expenditure not delivering benefit due to a relative few vehicles blocking up Kingsley St and aggravated by the very poor traffic light sequencing at this point. (The lights favour general Barry Drive traffic with very long greens, with only a short period per cycle for the buses. Even off-peak, a near 2 min wait is common whilst the lights stay green for a few scattered vehicles in the rest of Barry Dr. Then pedestrian and side street traffic seem to get priority before the buses. Finally, when the buses do get a green, a fourth waiting bus back usually doesn't get a go and must wait the cycle round again.)
   

Buzz Killington

Presumably TC will be liaising with their roads counterparts on this, but it still may be worth you logging a request with access Canberra in your capacity as a public transport user to have the issue investigated.